The Complete Guide to Home Adjustments for Independent Living

6047376560 6226027f74 q The Complete Guide to Home Adjustments for Independent LivingAs you begin to get older, you have to start thinking about how you will manage if it becomes harder for you to look after yourself. Naturally, most people want to stay as independent as they can for as long as they can. For some, it can make more sense to move into assisted living, or even into a care home. But living independently at home is possible for many. One of the biggest obstacles to independent living is the layout and structure of people’s houses. They’re often not designed for people who have problems with mobility, such as wheelchair users or people with arthritis.

Day-to-day tasks such as getting in the bath or shower, going up and down stairs or even going through doorways can become a struggle. But with the right modifications and tools in your home, independent living can become a reality. Instead of leaving your home to move somewhere designed with limited mobility in mind, stay in your home and make improvements. You can adjust everything from your bath to your armchairs. And with some other handy little tools and gadgets, you can do everything for yourself.

Photo by Gary Knight

Widening Doorways

One of the greatest barriers to staying in a home that isn’t set up for people with mobility issues is the amount of space to move around. When you start to slow down and need help getting around, you can find that your home doesn’t allow movement for more than a person on their own. If you need to use a walking frame, crutches or a wheelchair, doorframes and room layouts can turn out to be a bit of a tight squeeze. You might even be having trouble with spacial awareness and need a bit more room to move about. Wheelchairs can be especially difficult. Although they often fit through the door, there isn’t always enough room for your hands, which is a disaster if you prefer to push yourself. You don’t want to have to have someone help you every time you want to go through the door. What you can do is have your doorways widened. Although this sounds like a big task, it’s easy and quick.

Kitchen Remodeling

Accessibility is extremely important in the kitchen. When you’re working with hot pans and sharp knives, you don’t want to be struggling to reach the surfaces or move around. If you’re a wheelchair user, you can have countertops, and other surfaces lowered. Doing so makes it easy for you to prepare food, do the dishes and other kitchen tasks. Other barriers you could change or remove include having an island in the middle of the kitchen or a layout that’s too compact. Cooking is one of the main things a lot of people feel helps them to maintain their independence and dignity. It helps them feel that they can provide for themselves. To keep you cooking longer, look into adjustments you can make to your kitchen.

Stairlifts for Independent Living

Getting up the stairs can be a struggle for even the most spritely of people. Even in their younger days, a lot of people find themselves out of puff from just walking up and down the stairs a few times. Later, the climbing the stairs can begin to feel like climbing Mount Everest. One of the most popular pieces of home medical equipment is the stairlift. Installing a stairlift makes getting up and down the stairs as easy as pie. Take your freedom back by adding a stairlift to your home and making the stairs a delight and not a struggle. Just sit back and relax as the stairlift does its work.

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Photo by Creative Bathroom Designs

Bathroom Remodeling

The bathroom might be the most important room when it comes to maintaining your independence and dignity. You want to be able to manage alone for as long as possible, and the best way to do that is to make your bathroom fit around you. There are lots of modifications you can do in your bathroom to make bathing, showering and using the toilet much easier. One of the simplest things to put in is grab rails. Whether you want to alter your bath, shower or toilet, putting handrails in will help you to feel more secure and stable when you’re using the bathroom. If you want to go further, you can change your bathroom suite itself. The risk of slipping in the bath or shower is one that worries a lot of people. But you can relieve your worry with a walk-in tub, a roll-in shower for wheelchair users or a tub-to-shower conversion.

Walk in tubs remove the need to try and climb in and out of the bath. You simply open the door, walk in and fill the tub (remembering to shut the door!) Most come with seats to lower yourself onto, which you can combine with a handrail. You can modify your shower by installing rails, as well as a seat. Often standing for prolonged amounts of time in the shower can be hard, but you don’t have to worry with a modified shower.

Handy Tools and Gadgets

As well as making big and small changes to your home, you can use all kinds of tools and gadgets to help you regain or maintain your freedom at home. From gardening tools to simple pick-up tools, there are lots of things that can help you do everyday tasks. Pick-up tools are great to help you grab things without bending down and you can get tools to help you with everything from turning keys to opening doors. If you have low vision or hearing, lots of aids can help you by providing speech options and sound amplifiers. And of course, there’s the fun things. You shouldn’t have to stop gardening, reading or exercising because you’re getting older. There are lots of tools to help you in the garden, lights and magnifiers to help you read and even devices to help you exercise gently.

Stay in control of your life by fitting your home around you, instead of moving somewhere new. You can keep your independence and your dignity, without having to sacrifice your home or privacy.

Medical Alert Scam Calls Recorded

After receiving several medical alert scam calls this week from fraudulent medical alert scam robo-callers, we decided to do some hunting around to capture audio from the call.  Perhaps this captured medical alert scam recording will help educate the public (including national/local agencies) to put an end to this madness.  These sickos are targeting seniors with an offer of a “personal medical alert system at no cost to you”.  The call goes on “Since you’ve already been referred by a medical professional, your package is ready to be shipped”.  The scam doesn’t end there… “By receiving the package today” the recording states, “you’re now eligible to receive $1000 dollars in grocery saving coupons that can be used for products you already buy and use”. This scam has been going on for over a year now.  Federal and state agencies need to get a better handle on these calls targeting aging adults, kids, and the unsuspecting public in general.  Our advice is to hang up immediately (do not press any key), note the number you received the call from, and notify the appropriate authorities.  Your notification should include the FCC complaint page, as well as the Do Not Call Registry.

Medical Alert Scam Call Recording

Ironically The Senior List received has received callsl from these medical alert fraudsters, the latest coming just this week.  The numbers that were captured through our caller ID was 212-660-5351 and the other number we captured was 516-435-7389.  The script went just as the recorded call noted, but one of the calls also added a 75% prescription discount card.  If you’re interested in what the FTC says about robo calls, see the video below. Have you received a robo call for a free medical alert system?  What did you do?  How do you feel about these kind of calls being directed into people’s homes?  Let us know in the comments section below.

Special thanks to John’s recorded SPAM calls for the original audio feed

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Best Places To Retire For Less

SavannahGA Best Places To Retire For Less

Best places to retire for less

If you’ve been following our posts recently you know we published a list of best beach towns to retire in America.  This list is admittedly biased to towns out west (hey we spend a lot of time out there), but each of these beach communities is wonderful in it’s own right.  The Motley Fool recently published a short-list of friendly boomer cities where retirees can live it up for less.  In their best places to retire for less, the Motley Fool included 3 sleepers… Savannah Georgia (love it), Tulsa Oklahoma (interesting choice), and Omaha Nebraska (this works).  I wouldn’t have thought about the latter 2, if not for some of the context provided.  In addition, I like the criteria used to make the recommendations.  Here’s what these fools (it’s Motley Fool for heavens sake) took into consideration when looking a the best places to retire for less.  We also threw in a few suggestions of our own.  If you’re looking for the best places to retire for less, you should consider the following criteria as you map out your own retirement plans.

When thinking about retirement cities, consider the following criteria

  • Cost of Living (including state income tax rate, sales tax rate, and cost of living compared to the average COL)
  • Cultural Amenities and Offerings (like museums, parks, theater, and public squares)
  • The Employment Rate (a nice barometer of economic stability)
  • Is there a University/College near by?
  • Are there senior care facilities, and/or home health agencies adequately serving the area?
  • Is it close enough to your kids, your grand kids, and/or your close friends?

For another great list of affordable retirement cities, check out the folks at Grandparents.com.  They also published a list of the “6 Most Affordable Places to Retire“.  Another nice resource to check out is Sperlings Best Places.  They provide demographic info for cities that you may be considering as a retirement destination.  If you have other criteria used in making a retirement living choice, let us know in the comments below! We’d love to hear from you.

Photo: Wikipedia/Spyder_Monkey

Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

Looking forward to retiring in the same community you slaved away in for 40+ years?  If not, you may be dreaming of life in a cozy beach community where the idea of fresh air, fresh fish, and fresh adventures await!  If that’s the case, here’s a list of the best beach towns in America for retirement.  Enjoy your golden active years near the many relaxing beach communities we have right here in our own backyard.

Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

#1 Manzanita (Oregon)Manzanita1 Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

This sleepy little community boasts a wonderful mix of full timers and part time residents.  With 7 miles of sandy beaches, Manzanita offers lots of room to run, walk, surf, or chill out.  The Oregon Coast Visitors Association maintains that “Manzanita possesses the third most photographed scenery in Oregon”.  Add in a local golf course, and a few nice restaurants/pubs and now you’ve got a full plate!  Located just West of Portland (and south of Cannon Beach) Manzanita has less than 1,000 full-time residence and at the time of the 2010 census just 315 households.  If you’re looking for a simple living this qualifies as one of the best beach towns in America for retirement.  Median age in the city is 59.9 years young.  –photos courtesy of jamesonf via Flickr

Manzanita Oregon Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

 #2 Santa Cruz (California)

santa cruz boardwalk Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

Santa Cruz is a throw back town.  Having just spent our spring break there this year, we loved every minute of this surfer’s paradise.  Looking for something a little laid back and dog friendly?  You just found it.  Add in a mix of fine dining, and local eateries (where the food is fresh and affordable), you won’t go home hungry.  2011 census pegged Santa Cruz at just over 60,000 residence with 32.1% of the population between the ages of 45 and older.  Median age in Santa Cruz is 29.9 (wikipedia).  Beach dwelling, wine tasting, museums, and a university add to the cultural appeal of Santa Cruz, and it’s a sure draw for those looking for an active retirement.  –photos courtesy of Thomas Hawk & Hudheer G via Flickr

santa cruz beach Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

#3 Beaufort (South Carolina)

Beaufort dock Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

Beaufort SC was named Coastal Living Magazine’s Happiest Seaside Town in 2013.  This alone should qualify it as one of the best beach towns in America for retirement!  Beaufort is located on Port Royal Island, in the heart of the Sea Islands.  Water, history and culture surround this area, and it’s about as friendly a town as you’ll ever come across.  “Chartered in 1711, it is the second-oldest city in South Carolina, behind Charleston. The city’s population was 12,361 in the 2010 census.  It is a primary city within the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton-Beaufort Metropolitan Statistical Area.” (Wikipedia)  As of the 2010 census there were just over 12,000 people residing in the city of Beaufort.  A full 30% of the people in Beaufort SC are over the age of 45.  –photos courtesy of scarter392 & Henry de Saussure Copeland via Flickr

beaufort city Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

#4 Friday Harbor (San Juan Island WA)

Friday Harbor Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

Friday Harbor is a gorgeous little island community available only by ferry service (or float plane).  With just over 2,000 residents, it’s not easy to get lost around Friday Harbor.  Census data notes that 44.8% of the city is 45 years old or older.  Lots of things to do on San Juan Island including hiking, biking, fishing, walking, kayaking and sampling the many local eateries and coffee shops around town.  Summertime brings in quite a number of tourists, but everyone is interested in fresh air and the active outdoor culture that abounds here.  –photos courtesy of Chase N. & Mike Kelley via Flickr

friday harbor ferry Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

#5 Steilacoom (Washington)

Steilacoom sunset Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

Located 45 miles SW of Seattle, Steilacoom (pronounced “still-a-come”)seems to move in slow motion and that’s just how the 6,000 or so full-time locals love it.  The 4th of July celebration brings in over 18,000 visitors, and all come for good eats, good conversation, and fireworks over Sunnyside Beach.  This Puget Sound community boasts a median age of 45.4 (as of the 2010 census) and 39.3% of folks are 45 years of age or older.  –photos courtesy of L-M-E & camknows via Flickr

Steilacoom festival Best Beach Towns In America For Retirement

Do Your Research Before Buying A Medical Alert System

OneCall speaker Do Your Research Before Buying A Medical Alert SystemWhen consumers are faced with purchasing a medical alert system for a family member, they are typically in crisis mode, and generally prone to making rash decisions.  Don’t fall into this oh-so-common trap.  The Senior List is full of horror stories about folks that are trapped into long-term contracts, or faced with equipment that won’t function properly.  Before buying a medical alert system, it’s important that you DO YOUR RESEARCH.    Don’t think you can just jump on a particular brand and make a quick decision.  You might get lucky, but I don’t like those odds for most folks (and certainly not for our readers).

4 things you need to know before buying a medial alert system:

  1. What medical alert system options are out there?
  2. How reliable is the medical alert system?
  3. Is it easy to install and use?
  4. How much does it cost?

Let’s tackle each of these topics together so that you have a (more) solid base of understanding, and can make more informed choices down the road.

What medical alert system options are out there?

There are a lot of options out there, but the 2 biggest considerations here are;  Whether you need a traditional in-home (uses a home phone line) alert system, or a mobile (cellular based) medical alert system.

The traditional in-home medical alert systems utilize the home phone line, and the pendant alert buttons work like old cordless phones.  When depressed they communicate with a base station, and that base station makes the call (in case of emergency).  Most of these traditional pendant type medical alert systems work well, and have adequate coverage for an average size home.  Many of the pendants can be worn in the shower, and most have good battery lives.  These traditional options usually cost a little bit less than their cellular based cousins.

The mobile (cellular) based medical alert systems seem to be getting a lot of attention lately.  These have the range of a typical cell phone, and typically targeted at the more mobile  users.  These options are a little more functional but also carry a little more of a price tag on them.

Our advice:  If your loved one is not mobile and almost always in the home environment, a traditional pendant style medical alert is just fine.  If they get out to walk, garden, shop, or spend time with friends away from home, go with a mobile option.

How reliable is the medical alert system?

Well reliability is an interesting question, because frankly these medical alert systems aren’t (or shouldn’t be) complex.  You should ask about battery life, water resistance, range, average response times, and read the reviews of medical alert systems that you’re considering.  Generally if you go with a reputable company, they’ll take care of you.  If you don’t do your research and get stuck with someone that won’t back-up their product, you’re in trouble.

Our advice:  Take this list of questions you should be asking each medical alert provider and use it accordingly. (Pass this list on to anyone that can use it.  We hate seeing folks get burned!)

Is the medical alert system easy to install and use?

You’d think these things would be intuitive enough to set-up, test, and use… but in some cases they’re just not.  Take a look at the Verizon SureResponse Medical Alert System Reviews.  A quick read of the reviews tells you all you need to know.  We recommend you check other sources in addition to The Senior List, but yikes… These guys need to get it together.  Stick with manufacturers that will work with you if something goes wrong.

Our advice:  Make sure you don’t sign a long-term commitment until you’re 100% comfortable doing so.  IF a month-to-month is a bit more expensive but you’re still unsure.  Take it for a test drive, and consider it insurance (against making a bad medical alert call).

How much does it cost?

Traditional pendant style medical alert systems are going to run you between $20-$40 dollars per month.  I wouldn’t be paying more than $29 per month if I had minimal needs.  For cellular based models be prepared to pay just a bit more than the in-home models. Be advised that GreatCall has a nice mobile option that starts at $19 per month.  You don’t need to spend a lot to get what you need.  You just need to do your research!

Our advice:  In the end make sure you follow our top 3 rules when considering medical alert systems:  Research in advance, ask a lot of questions, and don’t get stuck with a long-term contract that you can’t afford or don’t want!

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Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

Purportedly, journalist Ken Griffiths of The Sunday Times took a photo of an elderly couple in the same place (outside their home), each season for 12 consecutive years.  There are many theories surrounding this series of photos.  Some say it’s Ken Griffiths’ parents and he chronicled their love for one another through their final 12 seasons together.  Others merely note the acclaimed photographer and journalist took the photos of some would be friends to be originally published in 1973.  The results no matter which way you cut it are amazing, and they are making their way around the web for all to ponder.

“When you’re young you prefer the vulgar months, the fullness of the seasons. As you grow older you learn to like the in-between times, the months that can’t make up their minds. Perhaps it’s a way of admitting that things can’t ever bear the same certainty again.”
― Julian Barnes, Flaubert’s Parrot

There is something magical about each season anew.  Each bring with it inevitable change, glory and even decay.  Spring brings with it eternal hope and each season unveils a new chapter.  The same holds true in our lives, and I love to think about the parallels between our mother earth… and each of us that share her for a brief moment in time.

KenGriffiths1b Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths2b Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths3 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths4 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths5 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths6 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths7 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths8 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths9 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths10 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths11 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

KenGriffiths12 Photo Of Elderly Couple In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

Improve Home Access For Seniors – Tune Up Your Doors

shutterstock 142445545 150x150 Improve Home Access For Seniors   Tune Up Your DoorsAre the doors in your home sticky, narrow or just plain unwieldy? For most of us, this can be a big annoyance. However, for seniors, it can be a significant impediment to mobility in the home and overall home access for seniors.

Fortunately, there are many things you can do to improve the situation and make daily life a little easier.

Here are some ideas:

Door Knobs – Consider replacing door knobs with door levers. These are simply easier for seniors to open than a traditional round door knob. Internal door hardware is affordable and relatively easy to replace. Entry door locksets are more expensive, but won’t necessarily break the bank if you shop around.

Misaligned Doors – When doors are out of alignment, they can rub on the frame and become difficult to open and close. There are a few quick tricks you can try before you resort to re-framing the door.

  • If the problem is very minor, you can sometimes just sand the edge of the door that is rubbing. This is permanent and is not recommended if the problem is seasonal or if too much material must be removed.
  • Use shims to move the upper or lower hinge out from the door frame slightly. While you may be able to use cardboard or washers to accomplish this, it’s probably better to purchase door shims that are specifically designed for this purpose.
  • Another trick is to slightly bend one or both of the door hinge knuckles. Crescent wrenches are frequently used for this, but there are now knuckle bender tools to make it easier.

Narrow Doorways – Some doorways are too narrow to provide access for a walker or wheelchair. You have a few options:

  • ‘Swing clear’ hinges are a great way to improve access. As the name implies, these hinges allow the door to swing completely out of the door opening. In some cases, this can add a couple inches of badly needed clearance.
  • If you don’t need to close that particular door, consider removing the door and hinge altogether. You can also remove the innermost strip of trim that functions as a door stop. If the doorway needs to be even wider, you can try removing the entire door frame and trimming out the opening with thin sheet-rock.
  • Depending on the location in your home and the wall framing surrounding the door, you may be able to replace the existing door with a wider pre-hung door. While this may not be a DIY job, a good contractor can probably do it for a reasonable price.

Garage Doors – Not only can garage doors be difficult to open and close, they can be downright hazardous for some seniors. While most problems with garage doors can be easily fixed, it is recommended that you hire a licensed contractor for significant improvements. Garage door springs are dangerous to work with and some municipalities may even require building permits.

  • If you have a slab garage door, check into getting a roll-up door. These should be much safer and easier for seniors to manage.
  • Remove dirt and debris from the garage door and the areas around it.
  • Lubricate your door hardware. If you are unsure of the best type, look for a lubricant specifically labeled for garage door hardware.
  • Replace your garage door springs. If the springs are old, they may not be functioning as well as they should. They could also be dangerous in the event of a failure.
  • If you don’t have one already, consider purchasing an automatic garage door opener. The quality of these continues to improve and they are more affordable than ever.

Sliding Doors – Sliding doors are inherently more difficult to open than swinging doors and can be even more of a challenge for seniors. These generally require more ongoing maintenance to function smoothly.

  • Clean out the tracks regularly.
  • Lubricate moving parts.
  • Although it can be tricky, many sliding doors have screws to adjust alignment. If needed, replacement parts are generally available as well.
  • Consider replacing a sliding door with a pair of swinging French doors. Because the sliding door opening is typically wide, replacement with French doors is generally easier than many other installations.

Keyless Entry Systems – Some seniors have difficulties when using keys. Door locks with combination buttons and remote key fobs are now available. Some of these can even be activated by other remote devices such as cell phones or security systems.

While these are all great improvements for the doors themselves, don’t forget to address the lighting near your doorways. For example, motion detectors can automatically turn on the lights when approaching the door. This will free up both hands for opening the door, carrying groceries or even stability. Now all you need is a friendly welcome mat!

7 Options For Senior Friendly Bathrooms

canstockphoto3056186 150x150 7 Options For Senior Friendly BathroomsFor the elderly, using the bathroom effectively – whether it is the toilet, faucets, or the shower and bathtub – can be difficult. For people who have lost mobility and strength, standing in a shower for a long time isn’t possible, and getting in and out of a bathtub is a risky proposition.

Thankfully there has been progress in bathroom remodeling geared towards helping seniors navigate the bathroom with ease. The remodeling covers a wide range, from something as simple as a sprayer attachment that allows for the person to sit while bathing, to curbless showers that remove the need to step up for access. These changes can help the elderly be more independent in the bathroom, and they also help the elderly caregiver give better care to their loved one.

Options For Senior Friendly Bathrooms:

1. Install lever faucets. Having a lever faucet gets rid of the twisting and turning that can be difficult for the elderly. There are hundreds of different styles to choose from, including foot operated faucets. Installing a new faucet isn’t as difficult as it once was, but anytime you’re dealing with plumbing, it is good to at least talk with a professional before making the change yourself.

2. Get a sprayer attachment for your shower-head. A shower-head that you can detach and hold in your hand makes bathing really easy. It furthermore eliminates the need to stand while showering, certainly a bonus for those who have problems standing for long periods. Being able to sit and shower also means more independence for the elderly.

3. Install grab bars and rails. This is one of the easiest and cost-effective ways to make your bathroom more elderly-friendly. Installing grab bars and rails in the shower, bathtub and near the toilet makes bathing and using the toilet easier not only for the elderly person, but for the caregiver as well. The grab bars and rails can be installed yourself or you can hire someone to do the work.

4. Raise the height of the toilet. Simply raising the toilet’s height as little as three inches can make all the difference for seniors. There are a lot of options for raising the height of the toilet. You can simply raise the height of your existing toilet with a thick toilet seat, or you can replace your old toilet with a “Comfort Height” toilet. Once again, this can be a DIY project, or a project where you call a plumber.

5. Thick rugs for cushioning. This simple and easy addition to the bathroom is for the elderly caregivers that are spending time on their knees bathing someone. Placing a well-padded rug or pillow under your knees can keep your knees from hurting, making the bathing process less of a chore.

6. Non-slip bath mats and rugs. This is another easy way to prevent falls in the bathroom. Placing a non-slip mat in the shower prevents the senior from falling while showering and a non-slip rug on the floor outside the shower prevents any slipping once the senior is out of the shower. Non-slip tape is a lower cost option for shower pans and tub bottoms.

7. Curbless showers and Walk-in bathtubs. For the seniors that can’t lift their legs, putting in a curbless shower can be a lifesaver. A curbless shower can make the transition from wheelchair to shower seat simple and easy for the senior and the caregiver. Walk-in bath tubs are another popular option, as they are much easier to access than traditional tubs and most have a built in seat as well. There are many different options for installing a curbless shower or a walk-in bathtub. You can buy and have installed a pre-fabricated unit, or you can do it yourself. The advantage to having a new unit installed is that they are specifically designed for senior care.

There are twin goals to redoing your bathroom: the first is to increase the independence of your loved one, and the second is to make life easier for you the caregiver.

What changes to your bathroom have you made? What is the most cost-effective way to change your bathroom to suit the elderly?

Boomers Moving To Cities Out Of Suburbs

Courtesy of SalFalko Boomers Moving To Cities Out Of SuburbsWhen the kids are out on their own, baby boomers are headed for the city, and away from the suburbs.  Delaware Online reports that affluent boomers are trading in lawn mowing and commutes for easier access to restaurants, shopping and the theater.  For some there’s a bit of sticker shock when it comes to life in the high-rise.  For boomers moving to cities, downsizing is a on the menu.  Going from a 2400 square foot home in the burbs to an 1100 square foot condo downtown doesn’t always mean money in the bank.  For some it means paying through the nose for others it means getting acclimated to using a tax calculator… Living in the city isn’t cheap, but for many it’s worth it.

In July we wrote about the increasing trend of boomers and the money they’re spending on dining out.  It all makes sense… Boomers have the money, many are retiring early (or enjoying semi-retirement), and many are empty-nesters for the first time in a long time!

Click thru to read why the Hoexters and the Solymossys made the move from the burbs to the city life!

Medical Alert System Ratings and Reviews

eCare+Voice Medical Alert System Ratings and ReviewsIf you’ve visited The Senior List before you know that we love to post about technology, and how it affects the lives of boomers and seniors.  One way we do this is through product reviews, and another is through informative posts about the latest happenings in eldercare.  Some of the most interesting information comes from YOU (The Senior List community).  When readers become engaged, the comments come alive.  When the comments come alive, we can all relate and learn from each other.  Our community loves to share information when it relates to medical alert system ratings and reviews, and we’ve got all the top systems rated here on The Senior List.

Top Home Based Medical Alert Systems

One example of this is a popular post we wrote back in 2012, highlighting many of the top home based medical alert systems on the market.  That particular post offers a nice list of “tethered” (to a traditional home phone line) medical alert systems, with links to product reviews.  What is really interesting is the feedback in the comments located below that article.  There’s a lot of great information located on that page, and we’d like to thank those of you that have shared your experiences.  One of our chief goals is to continue to build a community that offers advice to others… A helping hand if you will!

“When readers become engaged, the comments come alive.  When the comments come alive, we can all relate and learn from each other.”

List of Mobile/Cellular Based Medical Alert Systems

If you’re searching for a list of mobile medical alert systems (cellular based), you’ll find that here on The Senior List as well.  We’ve reviewed a number of the top alert systems for seniors SureResponse lanyard Medical Alert System Ratings and Reviewsincluding GreatCall’s 5Star, the LifeTrac SecuraTrac, and the SureResponse from Verizon.  We’d like to encourage our readers to utilize the comments to voice your opinion following each post if you are so inclined.  In doing so, you’ll be providing feedback to others that could prove extremely valuable in their search for the right fit (and function) for any of the devices we discuss here on The Senior List.  Don’t forget to offer praise where it’s due either, there are a number of fantastic medical alert system providers out there offering great services to boomers and seniors.

If you (or someone you know) is currently using a medical alert system, we encourage you to take our Medical Alert System Customer Satisfaction Poll (located in the right hand side-bar).  Have a great weekend!

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