Elderly Couple Took Photo In Same Place Each Season Until The Inevitable

Purportedly, journalist Ken Griffiths of The Sunday Times took a photo of the same couple, in the same place (outside their home), each season for 12 consecutive years.  There are many theories surrounding this series of photos.  Some say it’s Ken Griffiths’ parents and he chronicled their love for one another through their final 12 seasons together.  Others merely note the acclaimed photographer and journalist took the photos of some would be friends to be originally published in 1973.  The results no matter which way you cut it are amazing, and they are making their way around the web for all to ponder.

“When you’re young you prefer the vulgar months, the fullness of the seasons. As you grow older you learn to like the in-between times, the months that can’t make up their minds. Perhaps it’s a way of admitting that things can’t ever bear the same certainty again.”
― Julian Barnes, Flaubert’s Parrot

There is something magical about each season anew.  Each bring with it inevitable change, glory and even decay.  Spring brings with it eternal hope and each season unveils a new chapter.  The same holds true in our lives, and I love to think about the parallels between our mother earth… and each of us that share her for a brief moment in time.

Ken Griffiths Season 1

Ken Griffiths Season 2

Ken Griffiths Season 3

Ken Griffiths Season 4

Ken Griffiths Season 5

Ken Griffiths Season 6

Ken Griffiths Season 7

Ken Griffiths Season 8

Ken Griffiths Season 9

Ken Griffiths Season 10

Ken Griffiths Season 11

Ken Griffiths Final Season

Improve Home Access and Mobility For Seniors – Tune Up Your Doors!

Creating an accessible home with doors and doorwaysAre the doors in your home sticky, narrow or just plain unwieldy? For most of us, this can be a big annoyance. However, for seniors, it can be a significant impediment to mobility in the home.

Fortunately, there are many things you can do to improve the situation and make daily life a little easier.

Here are some ideas:

Door Knobs - Consider replacing door knobs with door levers. These are simply easier for seniors to open than a traditional round door knob. Internal door hardware is affordable and relatively easy to replace. Entry door locksets are more expensive, but won’t necessarily break the bank if you shop around.

Misaligned Doors - When doors are out of alignment, they can rub on the frame and become difficult to open and close. There are a few quick tricks you can try before you resort to re-framing the door.

  • If the problem is very minor, you can sometimes just sand the edge of the door that is rubbing. This is permanent and is not recommended if the problem is seasonal or if too much material must be removed.
  • Use shims to move the upper or lower hinge out from the door frame slightly. While you may be able to use cardboard or washers to accomplish this, it’s probably better to purchase door shims that are specifically designed for this purpose.
  • Another trick is to slightly bend one or both of the door hinge knuckles. Crescent wrenches are frequently used for this, but there are now knuckle bender tools to make it easier.

Narrow Doorways - Some doorways are too narrow to provide access for a walker or wheelchair. You have a few options:

  • ‘Swing clear’ hinges are a great way to improve access. As the name implies, these hinges allow the door to swing completely out of the door opening. In some cases, this can add a couple inches of badly needed clearance.
  • If you don’t need to close that particular door, consider removing the door and hinge altogether. You can also remove the innermost strip of trim that functions as a door stop. If the doorway needs to be even wider, you can try removing the entire door frame and trimming out the opening with thin sheet-rock.
  • Depending on the location in your home and the wall framing surrounding the door, you may be able to replace the existing door with a wider pre-hung door. While this may not be a DIY job, a good contractor can probably do it for a reasonable price.

Garage Doors - Not only can garage doors be difficult to open and close, they can be downright hazardous for some seniors. While most problems with garage doors can be easily fixed, it is recommended that you hire a licensed contractor for significant improvements. Garage door springs are dangerous to work with and some municipalities may even require building permits.

  • If you have a slab garage door, check into getting a roll-up door. These should be much safer and easier for seniors to manage.
  • Remove dirt and debris from the garage door and the areas around it.
  • Lubricate your door hardware. If you are unsure of the best type, look for a lubricant specifically labeled for garage door hardware.
  • Replace your garage door springs. If the springs are old, they may not be functioning as well as they should. They could also be dangerous in the event of a failure.
  • If you don’t have one already, consider purchasing an automatic garage door opener. The quality of these continues to improve and they are more affordable than ever.

Sliding Doors - Sliding doors are inherently more difficult to open than swinging doors and can be even more of a challenge for seniors. These generally require more ongoing maintenance to function smoothly.

  • Clean out the tracks regularly.
  • Lubricate moving parts.
  • Although it can be tricky, many sliding doors have screws to adjust alignment. If needed, replacement parts are generally available as well.
  • Consider replacing a sliding door with a pair of swinging French doors. Because the sliding door opening is typically wide, replacement with French doors is generally easier than many other installations.

Keyless Entry Systems - Some seniors have difficulties when using keys. Door locks with combination buttons and remote key fobs are now available. Some of these can even be activated by other remote devices such as cell phones or security systems.

While these are all great improvements for the doors themselves, don’t forget to address the lighting near your doorways. For example, motion detectors can automatically turn on the lights when approaching the door. This will free up both hands for opening the door, carrying groceries or even stability. Now all you need is a friendly welcome mat!

7 Ways to Make Your Bathroom More Accessible for the Elderly

senior friendly bathroomFor the elderly, using the bathroom effectively – whether it is the toilet, faucets, or the shower and bathtub – can be difficult. For people who have lost mobility and strength, standing in a shower for a long time isn’t possible, and getting in and out of a bathtub is a risky proposition.

Thankfully there has been progress in bathroom remodeling geared towards helping seniors navigate the bathroom with ease. The remodeling covers a wide range, from something as simple as a sprayer attachment that allows for the person to sit while bathing, to curbless showers that remove the need to step up for access. These changes can help the elderly be more independent in the bathroom, and they also help the elderly caregiver give better care to their loved one.

Here are seven ways you can make your bathroom more accessible for the elderly.

1. Install lever faucets. Having a lever faucet gets rid of the twisting and turning that can be difficult for the elderly. There are hundreds of different styles to choose from, including foot operated faucets. Installing a new faucet isn’t as difficult as it once was, but anytime you’re dealing with plumbing, it is good to at least talk with a professional before making the change yourself.

2. Get a sprayer attachment for your shower-head. A shower-head that you can detach and hold in your hand makes bathing really easy. It furthermore eliminates the need to stand while showering, certainly a bonus for those who have problems standing for long periods. Being able to sit and shower also means more independence for the elderly.

3. Install grab bars and rails. This is one of the easiest and cost-effective ways to make your bathroom more elderly-friendly. Installing grab bars and rails in the shower, bathtub and near the toilet makes bathing and using the toilet easier not only for the elderly person, but for the caregiver as well. The grab bars and rails can be installed yourself or you can hire someone to do the work.

4. Raise the height of the toilet. Simply raising the toilet’s height as little as three inches can make all the difference for seniors. There are a lot of options for raising the height of the toilet. You can simply raise the height of your existing toilet with a thick toilet seat, or you can replace your old toilet with a “Comfort Height” toilet. Once again, this can be a DIY project, or a project where you call a plumber.

5. Thick rugs for cushioning. This simple and easy addition to the bathroom is for the elderly caregivers that are spending time on their knees bathing someone. Placing a well-padded rug or pillow under your knees can keep your knees from hurting, making the bathing process less of a chore.

6. Non-slip bath mats and rugs. This is another easy way to prevent falls in the bathroom. Placing a non-slip mat in the shower prevents the senior from falling while showering and a non-slip rug on the floor outside the shower prevents any slipping once the senior is out of the shower. Non-slip tape is a lower cost option for shower pans and tub bottoms.

7. Curbless showers and Walk-in bathtubs. For the seniors that can’t lift their legs, putting in a curbless shower can be a lifesaver. A curbless shower can make the transition from wheelchair to shower seat simple and easy for the senior and the caregiver. Walk-in bath tubs are another popular option, as they are much easier to access than traditional tubs and most have a built in seat as well. There are many different options for installing a curbless shower or a walk-in bathtub. You can buy and have installed a pre-fabricated unit, or you can do it yourself. The advantage to having a new unit installed is that they are specifically designed for senior care.

There are twin goals to redoing your bathroom: the first is to increase the independence of your loved one, and the second is to make life easier for you the caregiver.

What changes to your bathroom have you made? What is the most cost-effective way to change your bathroom to suit the elderly?

Creating a Senior-Friendly Kitchen

Accessible homes and kitchens can keep seniors at home longer. It can be hard to accept the way our bodies change as we get older. Although this varies from person to person, one thing that most seniors have in common is the desire to maintain their independence and the ability to pursue the activities that they love as long as possible. If you have a handicapped or elderly relative living in your home, there are steps you can take to make this easier for them.

In particular, not only do your loved ones want to continue to care for themselves, they also want to feel that they are helping take care of others. One place that this can happen is the kitchen. A good home-cooked dinner often provides the foundation for family interaction and communication. Even something less elaborate like assembling pre-prepared meals or re-heating leftovers can make seniors feel like they are contributing to the general welfare of the household.

When taking on tasks in the kitchen, most seniors face a range of physical challenges. These include:

  • Reduced mobility

  • Reduced flexibility, meaning difficulty reaching and bending

  • Reduced stamina and balance problems

  • General physical weakness and other symptoms of physical decline

Here are some suggestions for how you can help your elderly or handicapped relatives deal with these issues.

1. Challenges Relating to Mobility

Make sure that important areas of the kitchen are accessible to seniors. Create a “working triangle,” that will allow seniors to move through the space comfortably. To ensure that seniors can access important storage areas like kitchen cabinets and pantries, as well as major appliances, find a construction company that focuses on remodeling and retrofitting areas inside the home to make them ADA compliant.

Additionally, for seniors with disabilities — in particular those who use wheelchairs — major appliance manufacturers like General Electric sell ADA-compliant refrigerators, ovens, microwaves, and dishwashers. Making changes to improve ease of access can make using the kitchen more comfortable not only for your older relatives, but for everyone else in the household as well.

2. Challenges Relating to Reduced Flexibility

Because seniors have difficulty both reaching high and bending low, store important items on the shelves in the kitchen cabinets and pantry that are between shoulder and knee level. Smaller and lighter containers or objects (particularly those made of plastic) can go higher, while heavier ones, particularly those made of glass or ceramic, should be placed lower down.

Other strategies to improve accessibility include using pull-down shelves, or even open shelving and eliminating doors entirely. Microwaves should go on counters so that they are easy to reach, with sufficient space for hot food to be put down right away once it is finished cooking.

3. Challenges Relating to Reduced Stamina

It is also difficult for seniors to stand for long periods of time. This is both because seniors grow tired more quickly and because their legs and feet are not as easily able to handle the strain. Make sure that countertops and other surfaces are low enough that seniors can perform tasks like chopping from a seated position.

4. Other Physical Challenges

Seniors need an appropriate level of visibility to ensure that they don’t trip or bump into cabinet doors or appliances while moving around the kitchen. Make sure the kitchen is evenly and brightly lit. In addition, because many seniors have hearing issues, any timers or smoke/fire alarms should be set at a frequency and volume that seniors can hear. Electric can openers and special faucets/cabinet hardware/handles can help seniors with arthritis. Because many seniors have strength issues, cabinet hardware that can be pulled is preferable to that requiring twisting.

Are there other challenges that you have confronted when trying to make your kitchen accessible to older relatives? What steps have you taken to deal with them?

Chris Long is a store associate at a Home Depot in the Chicago suburbs. Chris also writes about kitchen remodeling for the Home Depot website, providing tips to homeowners on kitchen cabinets, faucets, sinks and appliances.

 

Boomers Moving Out Of Suburbs Into Cities

Courtesy-of-SalFalkoWhen the kids are gone baby boomers are headed for the city, not just hanging out in the suburbs.  Delaware Online reports that affluent boomers are trading in lawn mowing and commutes for easier access to restaurants, shopping and the theater.  For some there’s a bit of sticker shock when it comes to life in the high-rise.  Going from a 2400 square foot home in the burbs to an 1100 square foot condo downtown doesn’t always mean money in the bank.  For some it means paying through the nose… Living in the city isn’t cheap, but for many it’s worth it.

In July we wrote about the increasing trend of boomers and the money they’re spending on dining out.  It all makes sense… Boomers have the money, many are retiring early (or enjoying semi-retirement), and many are empty-nesters for the first time in a long time!

Click thru to read why the Hoexters and the Solymossys made the move from the burbs to the city life!

Medical Alert System Ratings and Reviews

eCare+Voice medical alert systemIf you’ve visited The Senior List before you know that we love to post about technology, and how it affects the lives of boomers and seniors.  One way we do this is through product reviews, and another is through informative posts about the latest happenings in eldercare.  Some of the most interesting information comes from YOU (The Senior List community).  When readers become engaged, the comments come alive.  When the comments come alive, we can all relate and learn from each other.

Top Home Based Medical Alert Systems

One example of this is a popular post we wrote back in 2012, highlighting many of the top home based medical alert systems on the market.  That particular post offers a nice list of “tethered” (to a traditional home phone line) medical alert systems, with links to product reviews.  What is really interesting is the feedback in the comments located below that article.  There’s a lot of great information located on that page, and we’d like to thank those of you that have shared your experiences.  One of our chief goals is to continue to build a community that offers advice to others… A helping hand if you will!

“When readers become engaged, the comments come alive.  When the comments come alive, we can all relate and learn from each other.”

List of Mobile/Cellular Based Medical Alert Systems

If you’re searching for a list of mobile medical alert systems (cellular based), you’ll find that here on The Senior List as well.  We’ve reviewed a number of the top alert systems for seniors SureResponse with Lanyard photoincluding GreatCall’s 5Star, the LifeTrac SecuraTrac, and the SureResponse from Verizon.  We’d like to encourage our readers to utilize the comments to voice your opinion following each post if you are so inclined.  In doing so, you’ll be providing feedback to others that could prove extremely valuable in their search for the right fit (and function) for any of the devices we discuss here on The Senior List.  Don’t forget to offer praise where it’s due either, there are a number of fantastic medical alert system providers out there offering great services to boomers and seniors.

If you (or someone you know) is currently using a medical alert system, we encourage you to take our Medical Alert System Customer Satisfaction Poll (located in the right hand side-bar).  Have a great weekend!

Product Review: Video Care- Family Communication Made Simple

family communication made easy with Video CareMany of today’s seniors living at home don’t have a son or daughter next door.  The interaction with immediate family may be limited to phone calls, occasional visits, and holiday gatherings.  Video Care has developed a personal communication tool with a unique approach to solving the long-distance caregiver gap by combining complex technology with a simple, elder friendly interface.

Video Care brings face-to-face companionship and interaction to the elderly through a touch screen system that requires no mouse, keyboard or computer skills to operate.  A touch of the screen opens a two way video screen with a family member, caregiver or friend.

Video Care was kind enough to send me one of their systems to check out and see exactly how easy it would be for a senior with little or no computer skills.  I was very impressed with the simplicity of the unit and ease to set it up.  In addition to using two-way-video, loved ones can also share instant photos, videos and music.  Video Care also offers a nifty senior app if you want to share videos and photos directly from your smartphone.   The system can also be set up for medication, appointment, and activities of daily living reminders. Loved ones will be notified if the user does not respond to the reminders.

video care can be used to share photos

Video Care can be used to remind users to take their medication.

 

For professional caregivers, Video Care allows remote visits without the cost and time of driving to the home.  Clients can be checked on several times a day for a fraction of the cost of a typical home care visit.  Geriatric care managers could also use Video Care to check in with caregivers already in the home as a quality assurance tool, or as a problem solving option (in the case of any unusual behavior or symptoms).   Video Care is currently being used by in-home care agencies and geriatric care managers as a value-add to their current client base (I think this is a fantastic idea by the way).

I had the opportunity to speak with David Trescot, Co-Founder and CEO of Video Care.  One of my favorite stories he told me about Video Care users was about a daughter and her elderly mother who turn on Video Care every morning and use it as a “window” into each other’s homes.  They chat, have breakfast together, and go about their day with the two-way video all day long.  They’re able to participate in each other’s lives, and the daughter has peace of mind each morning when she sees her mother appear on the screen.

The other aspect I love about Video Care is that it can be used along the continuum of care for a loved one.  Video Care can operate from any location that has internet access (wireless works too).  I imagine the transition into assisted living or a skilled nursing facility could be greatly eased with daily check-ins and support from family and friends, even if they live on the other side of the world.

I look forward to following Video Care and others that will follow in the exploding telehealth and aging-in-place space.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
If you've used this product (or service): Please RATE your experience and COMMENT below!
Rating: 4.5/5 (4 votes cast)

Updated Review: The Verizon SureResponse Medical Alert System

SureResponse with Lanyard photoLatest Product Review: SureResponse Needs More Product Support

The Verizon SureResponse is one of the newer medical alert systems on the market today. This entry has great features in this space, HOWEVER Verizon’s execution thus far has been far from satisfactory. The SureResponse is mobile/cellular driven, offers GPS tracking, and can connect your loved ones to caregivers (or family members) if necessary.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is an updated product review based on feedback from users in our community. Click here to read the original SureResponse review and note the community comments.   You’ll note in this original that we stated that we’d “be looking forward to monitoring their success with this mobile medical alert system” and (with your feedback), many now have a new outlook on this device.  We do expect Verizon to improve their support of this product in the future.

Product Info: SureResponse Medical Alert

  • Name: Verizon SureResponse
  • Website Info: Verizon Wireless – SureResponse
  • Auto Fall Detection? : NoSure Response docking station photo
  • Equipment Cost: $229.99 (retail) OR 19.99 with a 2 year plan (note: early termination fees will apply)
  • Monthly Cost: $30 per device (also requires a $35 activation fee)
  • Features: Lanyard, Wrist Strap and Belt Clip Accessories Included, Water Resistant Panic Buttons, Untethered 24/7 Monitoring on a Cellular Network (Verizon Wireless), GPS Tracking (must be enabled and shared/volunteered), Convenience Calling, and an Online Portal to help manage lists of caregivers etc. (called SureResponse Online)

Review: SureResponse Medical Alert System from Verizon

Verizon SureResponse photoAs we noted above, Verizon’s SureResponse mobile emergency response system looks great, and has the financial backing of a leading mobile provider.  It stands to reason that this device should be at the top of our list when it comes to mobile medical alert systems but thus far, the support for the product hasn’t been there.  We like the form factor but it looks bulky on the wrist (uncomfortable) and we doubt many people would want to wear it there unless it gets much smaller. It’s bigger than traditional pendant alert systems, but it does more than they do.  If a pendant option is chosen, it may look like your loved one is wearing a small cell phone around their neck. We’re guessing this will be worn on the belt clip or kept in a pocket, although from an accessibility standpoint we do like a pendant option. This device lacks fall detection, but then again so do the others in this space (at this time). We probably wouldn’t trust this device in the shower. Until Verizon discloses a little more about just how water resistant the SureResponse is, we’d keep it out of the water.

OK now for the good stuff… From a product standpoint, we think this looks like a great option.  If (or when) the company gets their act together (and gives it the support it requires), it could be a great product.  The ability to be UNTETHERED is something that many folks are looking for (especially at comparable price points to tethered solutions). It’s backed by a reputable company with relatively transparent terms and conditions.  Also the (optional) GPS tracking is a nice feature on these cellular based medical alert systems.  If the Verizon tracking feature is not activated, it is only used in the case of an emergency (so emergency personnel can locate the person in need). Here’s another item worth mentioning- if your loved one needs to go into a nursing facility (under the existing terms and conditions) they ARE eligible to opt out of their 2 year agreement. There are specific details associated with this “second right to cancel” so read the T’s & C’s carefully.

The Bottom Line:

We want to see more from Verizon in terms of product support.  The Senior List even reached out to Verizon (back in March) in hopes that they’d respond to customer issues/inquiries but we’ve heard nothing.  Given this is new to the market and new to Verizon, we’re going to take a wait and see approach.  If we’re talking about the same support issues a year from now, we might as well scratch this one off the list.  We still think the SureResponse by Verizon is worth looking into. If Verizon supports the product like they should, it will be near the top of our list of mobile options.  For now, we’ll put them on our watch list.

Verizon Wireless SureResponse

Verizon Wireless medical alert

Click here to read the original SureResponse Review and note user comments

If you’ve used the SureResponse Medical Alert System or know someone who has, please give us your opinion in the comment section below and provide a star rating!

Video:

Read More:

Mobile Help Acquires Halo Monitoring to expand fall detection offering

Medical Alert Systems: Products and Reviews

Life Alert Product Review

The Top 10 Questions You Should Ask Before Buying A Medical Alert System

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
If you've used this product (or service): Please RATE your experience and COMMENT below!
Rating: 2.6/5 (21 votes cast)

Baby Boomers Not As Healthy

medical logoWhen we think of Baby Boomers we envision active, healthy individuals that are living life to it’s fullest!  But a new study in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) is casting some doubt on that “healthy” notion… Dr. Dana King (University of Virginia School of Medicine) and colleagues analyzed data from 2 separate National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey’s (NHANES) and compared the results with regard to health status, functional and work disability, healthy lifestyle characteristics, and presence of chronic disease.   Interestingly, today’s Boomers were found to be less healthy than the previous generation.

Obesity was more common among baby boomers and (surprisingly) today’s boomers don’t seem to be exercising as frequently.  These lifestyle related issues can lead to increases in hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes, and were noted to be higher in the Boomer group vs. the prior generation.  On a positive note, boomers smoking rates have fallen compared to previous generations and interestingly, boomers are in fact living longer (than previous generations).  The authors note that given the trends related to chronic conditions, baby boomers (78 million strong) could have an impact on rising health care costs in the future.  They further indicate “a clear need for policies that expand efforts at prevention and healthy lifestyle promotion in the baby boomer generation”.

“The findings from the present study documenting poorer health status and increased rates of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia support an increased likelihood for continued rising health care costs and a need for increased numbers of health professionals as baby boomers age.” — Dr’s King DE, Matheson E, Chirina S, Shankar A, and Broman-Fulks J. 2013. The Status of Baby Boomers’ Health in the United States: The Healthiest Generation? JAMA Internal Medicine

Time to keep a close watch on America’s gyms, vitamin/supplement manufacturers, pharma companies, and weight loss centers… They have a healthy future awaiting them!

How To Dispose Of Expired Medications In The Home

Photo of prescription drugsChances are you’re sitting on some old, expired, or never-used medications in your cabinet or drawer.  You know the drawer I’m talking about… It’s the one in the bathroom where all this stuff seems to accumulate.  Every time I open that drawer up I say to myself, “I’ve got to organize this drawer one of these days…” Then I close it up for another 60 days or so, and the cycle repeats itself!

If you’re a responsible adult (and I know you are) you should be aware of the right way to dispose of your old or expired medications in the home.  The FDA has guidelines for this incredible accumulation of beta blockers, ACE Inhibitors, anti-inflammatory meds, ibuprofen, that expire in our drawers or medicine cabinets.

How big of an issue is this you ask?  Well, just know that you’re not alone in your hoarding of expired meds… On April 27th the government sponsored a “National Take-Back Initiative” at 5,829 locations around the country.  During this single event, more than 742,497  pounds (or 371 tons) of prescription medications were recovered and properly disposed of.  We’re talking big-time pill poundage folks!  The DEA has sponsored 5 previous Take-Back Initiatives and all combined, more than 2.8 million pounds (1,409 tons) of medications have been removed as a potential threat to consumers.

Expiration dates do matter when it comes to the medications in your cabinet or drawer.  If your medicine has expired, the chemical composition of that drug may have changed leading to a weaker effect, stronger effect or no effect at all.  The FDA has put together a consumer alert video noting the importance of expiration dates (see below).

There’s been a bit of controversy regarding flushing certain medications down the toilet when disposing of them.  Some environmental organizations note that trace amounts of certain chemical may leach into organic material or appear back into our water supply.  Regardless, if you cannot get rid of your expired drugs at a DEA sponsored Take-Back event, the FDA recommends flushing certain drugs down the toilet (or down the drain).  This list is part of a risk mitigation strategy which balances the risk of (access to) these  drugs in the home, with environmental concerns.  Right or wrong, they’ve concluded that some drugs are flush-worthy (thank you Elaine Benes).

For those drugs that aren’t on the flush-list, the FDA offers these suggestions for drug disposal in the home: “Mix medicines (do NOT crush tablets or capsules) with an unpalatable substance such as kitty litter or used coffee grounds.  Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag and throw the container in your household trash.  Before throwing out your empty pill bottle or other empty medicine packaging, remember to scratch out all information on the prescription label to make it unreadable.” 

The best scenario for drug disposal is to take your unused medications to a National Take-Back Initiative event.  You can follow upcoming events by visiting the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s website for information on National Prescription Drug Take-Back Events.