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Assisted Living Documentary

Ever wondered what it's like living in an Assisted Living Facility (ALF)?  Dick Weinman, professor Emeritus at Oregon State University pulls back the curtain in a new assisted living documentary entitled “The Thin Edge of Dignity”.

Dick Weinman - The Thin Edge of Dignity
Dick Weinman | The Thin Edge of Dignity

Dick say's “It takes a village to accompany the elders on the final journey of life.  But in today's fragmented and mobile society, families no longer live together in a single household.  Once it took a village… Today it takes an ALF.”  This no-holds-barred exposé is an emotional roller coaster, and gives us a view that few outsiders get to see.

RELATED: EBOOK – FIND ASSISTED LIVING LIKE A PRO

Boomers, I sense this is a call for a mobilization.  One of Dick's goals is for a “cultural shift in long term care” and after watching this assisted living documentary you may want to join the brigade.

“An independent man of 80 years, disabled in a traffic accident, who strives to maintain his independence enclosed in the world of dependency of an Assisted Living Facility” – Dick Weinman

The Thin Edge Of Dignity – By Richard Weinman

Mr. Weinman, was an incredibly active broadcaster until injured in a tragic 2005 auto accident.  Dead at the scene, he was resuscitated and “put back together”.  He currently writes a column for AARP Oregon aptly entitled The Thin Edge of Dignity.  Dick's column is a bi-monthly column featuring “an independent man of 80 years, disabled in a traffic accident, who strives to maintain his independence enclosed in the world of dependency of an Assisted Living Facility”.

Assisted Living Documentary

Let us know what you think of Richard (Dick) Weinman's Assisted Living Documentary in the comments below.

3 Comments

  1. For someone so articulate, it is curious that he does not simply ask for what he wants instead of seeing himself as a perpetual victim. Tell the caregivers how he would prefer things, let them save his meal for him, ask for a shower later than usual. Losing independence is not easy, but often becoming disempowered is a choice. ALF residents and their caregivers are a team with each needing to appreciate the other and have good communication to effectively meet everyone’s needs.
  2. At 64 years old, the future sometimes appears as a vast wasteland, fraught with thunderstoms of unknowns. My grown son has just moved back into my home “to help”. After a year, I’m even less happy with the situation than one day one. So I begun thinking (no, day-dreaming) about moving into an ALF. Lol. Your for honest, clear assessment of the pros and cons of ALF living helped me remove my rose-colored glasses and seriously take stock of my future. Thank you very much for the insight and information. Blessings as you continue Mr. Weinman.

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